Category Archives: Research Methods

Posts about analytical approaches of all kinds as well as posts about finding, evaluating, and using information.

Tips and Tricks for 21st-Century Research and Writing

As a complement our discussions about new forms of scholarship and scholarly publication, I’d like to propose a session about how digital tools are already transforming the academic production of knowledge. Despite recent transformations, I think most scholars in the humanities still follow a research and writing model that goes back at least a hundred […]

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JSTOR Data for Research workshop

In this workshop we will provide both a general overview of the JSTOR Data for Research (DfR) service and a “how to” for using Hadoop and cloud computing for text mining large datasets. For the big data mining portion of the workshop we will be using a large dataset consisting of the JSTOR Early Journal […]

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Designing DH websites in public humanities with multimodal functions (mapping, archiving, crowd sourcing, and curating)

David Phillips and Tyler Pruitt, Wake Forest University What do you need to consider in planning and designing a website for a DH project meant as both a resource for the public and a vehicle for outreach and public input?¬†What strategies can you employ in creating such a site? We would like to explore and […]

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Atoms to Bits and back again

There have been sessions at past THATCamps that have explored the use of 3D design to envision historical sites or perhaps to demonstrate relationships of words in a concordance or index. In those cases the examples in most cases were a transference of Atoms (papers, manuscripts, notes from conversations) to bits (program design, programming, data […]

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Imagining THATClass: Move over STEM, Make Room for THAT!

Why should STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) have all the fun? It is time for the humanities to embrace the studio model as a pedagogical means to foster intellectual curiosity. MIT has NuVu; let’s create THATClass! Bring your ideas on partnerships, collaboration, technology integration, hands-on projects, uncovering content, and ways to apply knowledge and […]

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